Wednesday, 24 August 2016 05:46

Making tough household jobs easy, without nasty chemicals and toxins!

One of my favourite books is Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management. I read the first few chapters again and again and have put most of her tips to the test. Recently I found a copy of Readers Digest Good Housekeeping, and again found some wonderful tips for the home. I thought I would pass on my growing list to you and would love to hear about your tried and tested tips!

Here goes:

Vases

Soak in warm solution of water/vinegar. Add two tablespoons of uncooked rice and swirl around. Rinse and dry upside down

Carpet Stain:

If the stain is still wet, sprinkle with baking soda. Allow to dry, then vacuum. If stain is old and dry, saturate with club soda and scrub with a wet cloth. Then sprinkle bicarb and allow to dry.

Bathroom

Taps:

Use toothbrush dipped in bicarb/water and scrub to remove lime scale

Tiles:

Clean grouting with nailbrush and bicarb/water

Kitchen

Oven:

Sprinkle bicarb and water, allow to dry and wipe off. If done regularly you won't need anything else

Stainless steel:

Clean regularly and shine up with a touch of olive oil

Discoloured china:

Make a paste of baking soda and water to clean discoloured teacups and teapots. It's gentle enough for most fine china, and it's easy on the hands and the wallet.

Glassware:

When you're washing narrow-necked glass vases and decanters, add a little uncooked rice to the water. Your glassware will sparkle.

Aluminium pots:

Boil apple peels in aluminium pots: it will make cleaning them (the pots) much easier

Smelly bottles:

Half fill bottle with water and add 1 tbsp. bicarb. Shake well and allow to stand for about 1 hour.

Smelly cutting boards:

Rub it with a sliced lemon or lime.

Greasy dishes:

Soak in hot water with baking soda. Chemically, baking soda plus grease equals soap.

Stained crockery:

Soak overnight in a mixture of hot water and soda. Then rub with vinegar moistened cloth dipped in salt. This works very well with tea stains.

Glasses stuck together:

Put cold water in the top one and place the bottom glass in hot water. They should come apart.

Smelly grater:

Rub a hard crust of bread over it.

Smelly hands:

If you have a lingering onion smell on your hands, trying rinsing them with cold water, rubbing them with salt, and then rewashing them. You can also rub your hands with half a potato. (Do you have a trick?)

Stained hands:

Rubbing with a raw potato and then washing may remove many fruit and some vegetable stains.

Smelly kitchen:

For an inexpensive deodorizer, put some orange peel in the oven at 350F with the door ajar. If you have a really powerful odour to deal with, boil some cloves in a mixture of 1 cup of water and 1/4 cups of vinegar.

Rusting knives:

Stick them through an onion and leave them there for 1/2 hour, then wash and polish. Wipe them very lightly with a very light coating of vegetable oil to keep the rust from returning.

Oven:

Wipe with a solution of bicarb and water while still warm. If you have spilt food, sprinkle a combination of salt and cinnamon on any spills while baking, but you should also be able to use a spatula to lift the whole piece after the oven cools.

Burned pots and pans:

For iron, Pyrex and stainless steel pots, first scrape out what you can. Partly fill with water and bicarb. Boil for 10 minutes then let stand overnight. Clean with a scouring pad.
For aluminium pans, boil an onion in the pan, the burned stuff will float to the top.

Rusting pots:

Scour them with a hunk of raw potato dipped in cleaning powder.

Dull scissors:

Cut a piece of sandpaper into strips to sharpen.

Stuck screw top containers:

Just bang the top of the jar flatly on any hard surface. Now the jar should open with relative ease.

Dirty or stained thermos flask:

Fill with warm water plus 1 tsp. baking soda. Let sit overnight then clean and rinse thoroughly.

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